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Surveyors’ Professional Qualifications
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Always request confirmation of licensing credentials when hiring a Professional Surveyor. Only those licensed in the state in which services are to be performed are allowed to legally provide the services defined in the licensing laws found in that state’s Statutes and Regulations.  It is important to know that there are variations from state to state in the terminology used to describe a Professional Surveyor.

 

Some examples (not necessarily all-inclusive) of the different titles include: Licensed Surveyor; Licensed Land Surveyor; Professional Surveyor; Professional Land Surveyor; Registered Land Surveyor; Registered Professional Surveyor; Registered Professional Land Surveyor.

 

Each state has a licensing Board which critiques the qualifications and experience of those seeking licensure prior to those individuals being allowed to take the required examination(s) required for licensure. Those who have passed the Fundamentals exam are typically known as Surveyor Interns, or Surveyors-in-Training. These individuals are not allowed to provide the services of a Professional Surveyor. Only those who have successfully completed the Fundamentals exam, served the internship required by the state in which the license is to be issued, and successfully completed that state’s Principles and Practice exam are designated as Professional Surveyors. Typically, those who are licensed in one state, and seeking to be licensed in another state will be required to take only the state-specific exam for that state.

Historically, individuals have been allowed to become licensed as a Professional Surveyor in any given state through some combination of education, experience as a surveying intern, and examinations. Due in part to the advancements in the technology and instrumentation utilized by surveyors, throughout the past few decades the educational requirement to begin the internship stage of the licensing process has increased, with many states now requiring a minimum of a four-year BS degree in a curriculum approved for licensure, while other states have implemented two-year degree requirements. In any case, though, one is required to serve in an internship position, typically four (4) years, between passing the fundamentals exam, and sitting for the Principles and Practice exam.

 

In consideration of the ever-increasing advancements in technology, most state licensing boards now require those who are licensed Professional Surveyors in that state to complete some specified number of credit hours in relevant subjects during the period between license renewals.

 

To find information about the qualifications required by the respective states for designation as a Professional Surveyor, visit the website, http://ncees.org/licensing-boards/, and choose the website of the licensing board for the state about which you are seeking information.

 

NSPS strives to establish and further common interests, objectives, and political effort that would help bind the surveying profession into a unified body in the United States.

Governance: The National Society of Professional Surveyors Inc. is governed by a Board of Directors. The NSPS Board of Directors meets twice per year.   NSPS has working agreements with state surveying organizations which are represented on the NSPS Board of Directors, and with the NSPS Foundation, Inc. 


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